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You are viewing the most viewed ACE Reports by Physiotherapists over the last 30 days in all specialties.

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Synopsis: Femoral neck fractures, a type of hip fracture, are a common and disabling injury, particularly given an ageing population in many countries.Throughout the past half-century, multiple different treatments have evolved for the treatment of these fractures, and these include sliding hip screws, cannulated screws, hemiarthroplasty (HA), and total hip arthroplasty (THA).Given that femoral neck fractures have the potential to compromise blood flow to the femoral head, arthroplasty options have gained prominence in recent years.However, it remains unclear which of the two options (THA or HA) is optimal in this population.Thus, in this definitive, landmark randomized controlled trial, which is by far the largest of its kind to date, the investigators randomized 1495 patients 50 years of age older with a displaced femoral neck fracture to undergo HA or THA.The trial was conducted across 80 centres in 10 different countries.Primary outcome was a secondary hip procedure within 24 months.Secondary endpoints included death, serious adverse events, hip-related complications, health-related quality of life, function, and overall health.There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of revision rate, mortality, serious adverse events, revision procedures, EQ-5D, timed up and go test, or Short-Form 12 scores.There was a trend toward higher dislocation rates in THA, though this was not statistically significant.There was a significant difference in favour of THA on the WOMAC total and sub-scores, though this difference fell below the minimal clinically important threshold.Overall, in the absence of a convincing indication for THA, HA is a comparable treatment for femoral neck fracture which does not result in a significant difference in revision rate.There may be a slightly higher rate of serious adverse events with THA, and slightly better function with THA, though these differences may not reach clinical significance. Read More »
Level 1 RCT
4%
Synopsis: 141 patients aged 50 or above with knee osteoarthritis were randomized to receive kinesiotaping of the knee, sham kinesiotaping of the knee, or no treatment.The primary outcomes of interest were the sub-scores (pain, stiffness, function) of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) Osteoarthritis Index.Secondary outcomes of interest included the balance error scoring system (BESS), the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), the 10 meter walk test, and range of motion in flexion and extension.Follow up was performed 3 days after the application of treatment.Results revealed significantly different WOMAC pain, stiffness, and function sub-scores amongst the three groups, in favour of the kinesiotaping group. No significant differences... Read More »
Level 2 RCT
3%
Synopsis: 148 patients with knee osteoarthritis were randomized to ten, 10-minute sessions over two weeks of either simultaneous ultrasound and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation or ultrasound alone.Patients were assessed primarily for pain in six separate measures: total pain; pain during walking; pain during stair climbing; pain at night; pain at rest; and pain during weight-bearing. Results in all... Read More »
Level 2 RCT
3%
Synopsis: Five randomized controlled trials were included in this meta-analysis which sought to investigate the efficacy of mesenchymal stem cell injections in patients with knee osteoarthritis.Included studies featured various control groups, including placebo injection, hyaluronic acid injection, and no injection, as well as various concomitant treatments, including high tibial osteotomy, microfracture, platelet rich plasma injection and hyaluronic acid injection.Accordingly, clinical heterogeneity was assumed.Data was pooled from 12-24 month time points. Analyses on visual... Read More »
Level 2 Meta Analysis
2%
Synopsis: 106 adult patients with non-specific lower back pain and movement control impairment were randomized to partake in either a general exercise program or movement control exercise program lasting 9-12 weeks.The purpose of the study was to compare the efficacy of the two programs in terms of their ability to reduce pain and disability over the course of 1 year.Both exercise programs were found to significantly benefit patient outcome in terms of PSFS for activity limitation and GCPS for pain and disability, with no significant differences between groups at any time point.The movement control exercise program showed significantly greater RMDQ scores immediately post-intervention compared to general exercise, but by 6-month follow-up, this difference was no longer visible. No other differences... Read More »
Author verified Level 2 RCT
2%
Synopsis: 245 patients with chronic plantar fasciitis were randomized to 3 sessions of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) or placebo treatment. At 12 weeks and 12 months, the radial ESWT significantly improved the pain, function, and quality of life compared with placebo in patients with recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. Read More »
Author verified Level 1 RCT
2%
Synopsis: Twelve studies were included in this meta-analysis and systematic review to determine the effects of exercise therapy in the management of meniscal lesions as a non-operative treatment and as a modality for rehabilitation following meniscectomy compared to other treatments.This summary focused on the results from the meta-analyses conducted in this publication.When exercise therapy alone was compared to isolated meniscectomy/meniscal repair, exercise therapy demonstrated significantly greater strength in extension at 3 months, and no significant differences in short- and long-term pain and function.When exercise therapy was assessed as a rehabilitative treatment following meniscectomy/meniscal repair, standard exercise therapy demonstrated no significant differences in short-term pain and short- and long-term function when compared to alternative exercise therapies (early range of motion, isokinetic exercise, etc). There was limited... Read More »
Level 1 Meta Analysis
2%
Synopsis: 25 randomized controlled trials were included in this systematic review.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of non-surgical treatments currently available for thumb base osteoarthritis.Treatments were assessed for impact on outcomes including thumb pain and function.The results of the included studies indicated that intra-articular hyaluronate injections reduced pain over long periods of time (1 year), whereas steroid intra-articular injections and leech therapy reduced pain over shorter periods of time. Orthoses were found... Read More »
Author verified Level 2 Meta Analysis
2%
Synopsis: 70 sedentary females with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) were randomized to one of three groups: no treatment, knee exercise, or a combination of knee and hip exercise group for a period of 1 month to determine the influence of strengthening the hip abductors and lateral rotators on pain and function. After a month of strengthening, both the exercise groups showed a significant improvement in pain and function associated with PFPS, compared to the non-exercise group of patients. Read More »
Level 2 RCT
2%
Synopsis: 11 prospective, comparative studies (576 patients) which examined the effect of physiotherapy after hospital discharge on patients who had received a total hip arthroplasty were included in this systematic review.The purpose of the review was to analyse data that compared quality of life, muscle strength, function, walking ability and range of joint motion between groups who received physiotherapy and groups who did not in order to determine if there were benefits associated with this treatment. Results of the... Read More »
Level 2 Meta Analysis