AAOS2017: No clinical/radiographic advantage or disadvantage of high-flexion TKA

Study Type: Randomized Trial
OE Level of Evidence: N/A
Journal Level of Evidence: N/A
CONFERENCE ACE REPORTS
This ACE Report is a summary of a conference presentation or abstract. The information provided has limited the ability to provide an accurate assessment of the risk of bias or the overall quality. Please interpret the results with caution as trials may be in progress and select results may have been presented.
Synopsis
480 patients scheduled for bilateral total knee arthroplasty were randomized to a high-flexion device in one knee and a standard device in the other knee. Patients were assessed after a minimum of 10 years for incidence of aseptic loosening, clinical scores, and range of motion. One case of Please login to view the rest of this report. Please login to view the rest of this report.
Why was this study needed now?
High-flexion total knee implants were developed to allow for greater postoperative range of flexion compared to standard total knee implants. However, few studies have conducted extended follow-up and compared rates of aseptic loosening and revision between high-flexion and standard total knee systems.
What was the principal research question?
In total knee arthroplasty, do high-flexion knee prostheses significantly increase the incidence of aseptic loosening when compared to standard total knee systems, assessed after a minimum of 10 years?
Population: 480 patients scheduled for bilateral total knee arthroplasty.
Intervention: High-flexion group: In one knee, patients received a cruciate-substituting high-flexion total knee prosthesis
Comparison: Standard group: In one knee, patients received a standard cruciate-substituting total knee prosthesis.
Outcomes: The incidence of aseptic loosening was documented. Clinical scores included the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and the Knee Society Score (KSS). Knee range of motion was also measured.
Methods: RCT
Time: Follow ranged from 10 to 14 years postoperatively (Mean 12.3 years).
What were the important findings?
CONTENT IS LOCKED
What should I remember most?
How will this affect the care of my patients?
The authors responsible for this critical appraisal and ACE Report indicate no potential conflicts of interest relating to the content in the original publication.