AAOS2017: Comparing function between 135- and 155-degree reverse shoulder prostheses

Study Type: Randomized Trial
OE Level of Evidence: N/A
Journal Level of Evidence: N/A
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Synopsis
100 patients scheduled for reverse total shoulder arthroplasty were randomized to receive a prosthesis with either a 135-degree neck-shaft angle or a 155-degree neck-shaft angle. Patients were assessed for clinical scores and incidence of complications over 1 year postoperatively. Results demonstrated no Please login to view the rest of this report. Please login to view the rest of this report.
Why was this study needed now?
Reverse shoulder arthroplasty has been an increasingly popular method of treatment for end-stage shoulder arthropathy. Traditional prostheses were developed with a 155-degree neck-shaft angle, though more recently, prostheses with differing neck-shaft angles have been developed. This study sought to compare functional outcomes between prostheses with a 135-degree versus 155-degree neck-shaft angle.
What was the principal research question?
In reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, is there any significant difference in postoperative function between prostheses with a 155-degree neck-shaft angle and prostheses with a 135-degree neck-shaft angle when assessed after an average of 23 months follow-up?
Population: 100 patients scheduled for reverse total shoulder arthroplasty due to rotator cuff arthropathy.
Intervention: 135-degree group: Patients underwent reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, completed with the use of a prosthesis with a 135-degree neck-shaft angle. (n=50)
Comparison: 155-degree group: Patients underwent reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, completed with the use of a prosthesis with a 155-degree neck-shaft angle. (n=50)
Outcomes: The range of motion in flexion, abduction, internal rotation, and external rotation was measured. Clinical scores included a visual analog scale, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) Score, and the Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) score. The incidence of complications was recorded.
Methods: RCT
Time: Mean follow-up was 23 months
What were the important findings?
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How will this affect the care of my patients?
The authors responsible for this critical appraisal and ACE Report indicate no potential conflicts of interest relating to the content in the original publication.