Comparing hydrocortisone acetate/t-butylacetate vs placebo injection for knee OA

Study Type: Therapy
OE Level of Evidence: 2
Journal Level of Evidence: N/A
Synopsis
25 patients with a total of 38 knees with osteoarthritis were randomized to the order in which they received either hydrocortisone tert-butylacetate, hydrocortisone acetate, or placebo injections. For each treatment, four injections were given, every 2 weeks. A washout period Please login to view the rest of this report. Please login to view the rest of this report.
Funding: Not Reported
Conflicts: None disclosed
CONTENT IS LOCKED
Why was this study needed now?
Osteoarthritis is a leading to cause of disability in adults. Inflammation has been proposed as a possible factor that contributes to the progression which has lead to the treatment of this condition with corticosteroids. At the time of this publication, few randomized controlled trials had been conducted to establish the efficacy of intraarticular corticosteroid injections for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis.
What was the principal research question?
What is the comparative 8-week efficacy between intra-articular injections of hydrocortisone acetate, hydrocortisone tertiary-butylacetate, and placebo in patients with knee osteoarthritis?
Population: 25 patients involving 38 knees with osteoarthritis. Cases of intra-articular therapy within the previous 2 months were excluded. Patients were randomized to the order in which they received the three study injections (described below). A washout period of 8 weeks was used between injection courses.
Intervention: Hydrocortisone acetate injection: Patients received an injection of hydrocortisone acetate every 2 weeks for 8 weeks, for a total of four injections. Hydrocortisone tertiary-butylacetate injection: Patients received an injection of hydrocortisone tertiary-butylacetate every 2 weeks for 8 weeks, for a total of four injections.
Comparison: Placebo injection: Patients received an injection of placebo every 2 weeks for 8 weeks, for a total of four injections.
Outcomes: The outcome measures included: the time taken to walk 75 yards; range of knee motion and any extension deficit; tenderness graded from 0 to 4; and pain graded from 0 to 4.
Methods: RCT; Crossover design
Time: Assessment scheduled for every 2 weeks following the completion of injection courses.
What were the important findings?
What should I remember most?
How will this affect the care of my patients?
The authors responsible for this critical appraisal and ACE Report indicate no potential conflicts of interest relating to the content in the original publication.