AAOS2017: Triamcinonlone has higher rate of resolution for trigger finger vs dexamethasone

Study Type: Randomized Trial
OE Level of Evidence: N/A
Journal Level of Evidence: N/A
CONFERENCE ACE REPORTS
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Synopsis
69 patients with trigger finger were randomized to treatment with either triamcinolone injection or dexamethasone injection. Patients were followed up at 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 6 months for symptom resolution. Repeat injections were Please login to view the rest of this report. Please login to view the rest of this report.
Why was this study needed now?
Steroid injections are often used in the treatment of trigger finger. However, there has been a suggestion that the treatment efficacy may differ between differents types of steroid. This study sought to compare treatment efficacy between triamcinolone and dexamethasone injections in the treatment of trigger finger.
What was the principal research question?
In the treatment of idiopathic trigger finger, is there any significant difference between the triamcinolone and dexamethasone injections in treatment effectiveness and patient-reported function within 6-month follow-up?
Population: 69 patients with idiopathic trigger finger.
Intervention: Triamcinolone group: Patients received an injection of triamcinolone, If persistent or recurrent symptoms were noted, repeat injections could be administered. (n=37; Mean age: 60.2)
Comparison: Dexamethasone group: Patients received an injection of dexamethasone, If persistent or recurrent symptoms were noted, repeat injections could be administered. (n=32; Mean age: 63.6)
Outcomes: Outcome measures included treatment failure rate (persistent or recurrent symptoms after two injections), time to symptom resolution, the functional outcome on the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire (DASH), the incidence of progression to the indication for surgery, and the incidence of adverse events.
Methods: RCT
Time: Follow-up was scheduled for 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 6 months.
What were the important findings?
CONTENT IS LOCKED
What should I remember most?
How will this affect the care of my patients?
The authors responsible for this critical appraisal and ACE Report indicate no potential conflicts of interest relating to the content in the original publication.
Charles Touton
March 31, 2017
Orthopaedic Surgeon - United States
Was this dexamethasone phosphate or dexamethasone acetate. They do have different durations.
Dr. Ortho Evidence
April 3, 2017
Other - Canada
Dear Dr. Touton, Thank you for your comment. Unfortunately, the specific type of dexamethasone used in this trial was not provided in the conference abstract. When this trial is published in a medical journal we will provide those additional details.